Tag

Scrumban

Browsing

fast

Even though it has been thrown around the project management world for a while now, Scrum-ban is still a foggy concept to most of us. Some see it as improved scrum, others as improved kanban and while this train of thought is on the right path, it is not quite correct. Let us try and explain the hype of scrum-ban.

By definition scrum-ban is a mix of scrum and kanban. However, instead of being an improvement of either, it is a brand new approach especially dedicated to the teams working in fast-paced and fast-changing environments that require flexibility. This event driven approach is designed to push practices only when they are needed and no sooner. Compared to the traditional agile approaches, it offers wiggle room for teams that have to change their priorities often.

Business-People-Laptop-Meeting-PlanningHave you ever wondered what it would be like to have a long-term plan for your scrumban projects? Sure you have already read all about scrumban and enjoyed all the perks this methodology offers, but if you miss long-term insight you used to have, you may be surprised that there is still some things left to discover.

As you know, scrumban is based on planning on demand. The buffer triggers planning, once the backlog is empty, and guarantees that there is still work remaining to be done by the team in the meanwhile. However, by definition this planning focuses solely on the next best thing for the team to work on, simply disregarding any other planning as having no value. Therefore in this way only the most immediate plans are made, while anything not in the nearest future is forgotten.

scrumAt the moment, more and more companies are turning away from the old project management practices and searching for the new trends like agile and one of its methodologies – scrum. While most are successful in adopting the new practices, some however are struggling. While the reasons vary from the incompatibility with the process to the feeling that the methodology is too strict, the end result is the same – a team that is not getting a 100% result. However there seems to be a solution on the horizon – scrumban.

To put it simply scrumban is a mix of scrum and kanban. It takes certain components of both practices and mixes them together in order to create a new and enhanced one. In this post, however, we will not focus on the complete methodology, but instead we will take a look at how scrumban can improve the process of an unsuccessful scrum team.  There are various reasons why teams find the scrum methodology unfitting – strictness, time constraints, continuous planning and others. For these teams scrumban is a great solution because it still has the main scrum principles and at the same time offers more flexibility and freedom to move forward.

Team Foundation Server (TFS) is a tool widely used by companies all over the world. It offers a great variety of features and covers all of the development phases and aspects. However, when covering every aspect of a large process it is hard to be perfect and companies using TFS are still seeking additional features to get the perfect user experience.

Eylean Board aims to do exactly that – enhance TFS project management experience by providing additional features. In order to do that, Eylean works as a two-way integration into TFS. It takes all the information related to work items from TFS and represents it in visual task boards. The information in Eylean is updated regularly and any changes are immediately transferred back to TFS. This ensures that the users always have the most recent information and can use the two tools interchangeably. Let us look into what sought after additions does Eylean bring into the TFS experience.

tfs_transform

Last week we took a short glance at scrum basics in Eylean Board. This week we will continue our how-to series by taking a look at the ways a backlog can be managed when carrying out projects with Eylean Board.

Eylean is a versatile software and there are a few ways all of the things can be done. The backlog is no exception with a variation of backlogs through the different teams and projects. So just to get you on track, we will discuss the three most common ways the backlogs can be arranged – as a column, as a row and as a separate board.

Managing your backlog as a column is probably the most traditional way. In this case, you choose a section of columns, usually the one on the left side of the board and dedicate it to the backlog items. In this way, you will have a separate backlog for each row of the board and you will be able to see immediately how many tasks are waiting to be completed. While this is very convenient in seeing the progress of the project and the task load, it can get very busy and clustered when dealing with large projects. Therefore this way of backlog management is recommended for projects with fewer tasks.

Column

Planning on demand is a method suited for fast paced production planning which has a dynamic, always changing environment. It is based on Scrumban methodology, which combines the flexibility of Kanban and the basic features of Scrum. The key principles of planning on demand are that you don’t plan too much, you control what is being done, your team is always occupied and a team is always aware of the situation.

In the previous blog posts we discussed the team members, roles, work routines, planning, estimation, scope, and other aspects of Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban. There are a few other differences between the methodologies, which do not necessarily fall into one of the categories above. In this blog post we review the boards used in each case, prioritization, rules – and, most importantly – who should use which methodology. Boards The Scrum task board is defined…

In the previous blog post we reviewed the basic differences of Scrum, Kanban and Scrumban. In this blog post we dwell deeper and look into how the tasks are planned in each of the methodologies, as well as how is the performance measured in Scrum, Kanban and Scrumban. Planning routines  Planning routines define how the work is planned during the process and when the planning sessions take place. In Scrum, the product backlog items are…

As agile methodologies become more popular, there sometimes is confusion on what exactly they mean and how they differ. In this blog post we compare three methodologies and show how they differ across several dimensions. While there are some other agile approaches as well, we compare here the most common ones – Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban – as these are the ones that are used the most commonly. ITERATIONS Iterations are predefined timeframes, during…

Eylean - Efficient Visual Task Management SoftwareDownload for Free