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Top 5 Most Interesting Scrumban Boards

scrumbanAs most of you know, Scrumban is a mixture of Scrum and Kanban methodologies made in search of a stricter Kanban or a looser Scrum. While there are not many companies that go to Scrumban straight out of the gate, many find their way into it after a while and settle in a comfortable balance between strict and loose that this approach brings.

Just as you might expect, every team strikes this balance a little differently and this is very clear looking into their boards. To compare, lets take a look at just a few of the most interesting Scrumban boards.

Back office manager

scrumban 1

The board used by Wibas, is a great example of Scrumban. It is a nice mix of the two methodologies that allows the company to manage their back office efficiently and with ease, while keeping the priorities straight.

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Top 5 Most Interesting Scrum Boards

Scrum board is one of the most essential tools to ensure a smooth project and while most choose the traditional scrum boards for their teams, there are a few that decide to innovate and improve the traditions to fit their needs. Therefore this week we gathered up the 5 most interesting (at least to us) boards and present them to you!

The wall

The first example comes from Agile but Pragmatic. Instead of dealing with a traditional scrum board, they suggest to expand it into a whole wall. This allows the team to put additional information such as results of retrospective – decisions and actions to take in the current sprint, parking for not active tasks, the sprint calendar and other things. By dedicating the whole wall to the scrum board, the team expands their ability to have all the information in one place.

Scrum board wall

Source: Agile but Pragmatic.

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Scrum vs. Kanban vs. Scrumban: Iterations, Work Routines, and Scope Limits

As agile methodologies become more popular, there sometimes is confusion on what exactly they mean and how they differ. In this blog post we compare three methodologies and show how they differ across several dimensions.

While there are some other agile approaches as well, we compare here the most common ones – Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban – as these are the ones that are used the most commonly.

Scrum vs Kanban vs Scrumban: Agile Task Board



Iterations are predefined timeframes, during which a portion of work or a task is done. In Scrum, the teams typically work with 1-4 week sprints, during which the tasks are done before a deadline.

Kanban, on the other hand, does not have predefined iterations. Instead, teams work continuously, using releases shorter than one week, or bigger iterations like goals.

Scrumban combines the two approaches into one. Continuous work is used along with short iterations for planning, and longer cycles are used for release. 


Work routines define how the tasks are distributed among the team members. The push principle implies that tasks are assigned to the team members in a centralized way. The pull principle means that the tasks are “pulled” or chosen by team members themselves.

Scrum, Kanban and Scrumban are all agile methodologies, which use pull principle – whereby the team members choose the tasks they would like to work on. In Scrum, the tasks are chosen early by the team members. In every sprint, the tasks are chosen – or bound – by the team members before the sprint starts.

Kanban and Scrumban both use late binding – whereby the tasks are chosen during the work process. Once the current task is finished, the team members are free to choose further tasks they would like to work on. This is called late binding of tasks to the team members.


Scope limits define how the workload is limited in the agile methodologies.

In Scrum, the workload is limited with each sprint. The tasks cannot exceed the amount of work that can be done in one sprint. If the task cannot be completed within a sprint, it is typically split into smaller tasks, that can then fit within a sprint.

In Kanban and Scrumban, the work in progress limits define the scope of work. Therefore, if the maximum number of tasks in progress is three, the team members cannot work on more tasks than three at the same time.

In the next blog post we will cover planning routines, estimation, and performance metrics for each of these methodologies.

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