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Choose The Right Agile Method

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The next big question after deciding to go Agile is deciding which of the methods is right for you- will you go with Scrum, SoS or SAFe? While this decision is not an easy one and will take careful considerations, there are some aspects to each of the method that can help you along the way. Below you will find our easy 3 step process that will guarantee you consider the right options from the start.



For more helpful Agile cheats and tips see The Ultimate Agile Guide.


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Transitioning to Agile: Understanding the Methods

agile processAgile is not a new concept in the business world by any means – it is being adopted to more and more various fields, innovated and even discarded by some teams that feel they have had enough and are ready to move on. However, as the Agile reign continues, we find some of the practitioners are still trying to figure out how exactly to be Agile. For this, we are launching a series of blog posts explaining and answering some of the questions most new Agile users have.

To practice any methodology, first you have to know what it actually is and we find that there is still a lot of confusion out there about what exactly can be called Agile. So is Agile equivalent to Scrum as many out there believe? Or is Agile an ancestor of Extreme Programming? Let us try and explain everything.

Agile is a term that describes an effective way of working. It was introduced to the mass public by the release of the Agile Manifesto in 2001 and while it does specifically outline 4 values and 11 principles to be followed by the Agile teams, it does not include any particular methodology or recommendations of a methodology to be followed. So in itself, Agile is simply a framework to be followed.

Naturally, after the creation of the Manifesto, the practitioners felt a need of a clear method to be followed and thus the search has begun. Some looked into existing project management tools and though how they could be made to fit the Agile framework, others created whole new concepts and methods completely from scratch. Thus today we have a wide variety of Agile methods to choose from and new ones coming up every single day. Check out our Agile method genealogy tree.

So to answer the questions we have posed in the beginning, Agile is not Scrum, not XP and not any other method in particular, but all of the methods that comply with the Agile Manifesto are Agile. And as long as you are practicing one of them, your team is Agile too.


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Top 5 Most Interesting Scrumban Boards

scrumbanAs most of you know, Scrumban is a mixture of Scrum and Kanban methodologies made in search of a stricter Kanban or a looser Scrum. While there are not many companies that go to Scrumban straight out of the gate, many find their way into it after a while and settle in a comfortable balance between strict and loose that this approach brings.

Just as you might expect, every team strikes this balance a little differently and this is very clear looking into their boards. To compare, lets take a look at just a few of the most interesting Scrumban boards.

Back office manager

scrumban 1

The board used by Wibas, is a great example of Scrumban. It is a nice mix of the two methodologies that allows the company to manage their back office efficiently and with ease, while keeping the priorities straight.

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Scrumban – a project management approach for a fast paced team


Even though it has been thrown around the project management world for a while now, Scrum-ban is still a foggy concept to most of us. Some see it as improved scrum, others as improved kanban and while this train of thought is on the right path, it is not quite correct. Let us try and explain the hype of scrum-ban.

By definition scrum-ban is a mix of scrum and kanban. However, instead of being an improvement of either, it is a brand new approach especially dedicated to the teams working in fast-paced and fast-changing environments that require flexibility. This event driven approach is designed to push practices only when they are needed and no sooner. Compared to the traditional agile approaches, it offers wiggle room for teams that have to change their priorities often.

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Scrumban: on demand vs. long-term planning

Business-People-Laptop-Meeting-PlanningHave you ever wondered what it would be like to have a long-term plan for your scrumban projects? Sure you have already read all about scrumban and enjoyed all the perks this methodology offers, but if you miss long-term insight you used to have, you may be surprised that there is still some things left to discover.

As you know, scrumban is based on planning on demand. The buffer triggers planning, once the backlog is empty, and guarantees that there is still work remaining to be done by the team in the meanwhile. However, by definition this planning focuses solely on the next best thing for the team to work on, simply disregarding any other planning as having no value. Therefore in this way only the most immediate plans are made, while anything not in the nearest future is forgotten.

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From scrum to scrumban?

scrumAt the moment, more and more companies are turning away from the old project management practices and searching for the new trends like agile and one of its methodologies – scrum. While most are successful in adopting the new practices, some however are struggling. While the reasons vary from the incompatibility with the process to the feeling that the methodology is too strict, the end result is the same – a team that is not getting a 100% result. However there seems to be a solution on the horizon – scrumban.

To put it simply scrumban is a mix of scrum and kanban. It takes certain components of both practices and mixes them together in order to create a new and enhanced one. In this post, however, we will not focus on the complete methodology, but instead we will take a look at how scrumban can improve the process of an unsuccessful scrum team.  There are various reasons why teams find the scrum methodology unfitting – strictness, time constraints, continuous planning and others. For these teams scrumban is a great solution because it still has the main scrum principles and at the same time offers more flexibility and freedom to move forward.

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Improve your TFS experience with Eylean

Team Foundation Server (TFS) is a tool widely used by companies all over the world. It offers a great variety of features and covers all of the development phases and aspects. However, when covering every aspect of a large process it is hard to be perfect and companies using TFS are still seeking additional features to get the perfect user experience.

Eylean Board aims to do exactly that – enhance TFS project management experience by providing additional features. In order to do that, Eylean works as a two-way integration into TFS. It takes all the information related to work items from TFS and represents it in visual task boards. The information in Eylean is updated regularly and any changes are immediately transferred back to TFS. This ensures that the users always have the most recent information and can use the two tools interchangeably. Let us look into what sought after additions does Eylean bring into the TFS experience.


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Manage your backlog in Eylean

Last week we took a short glance at scrum basics in Eylean Board. This week we will continue our how-to series by taking a look at the ways a backlog can be managed when carrying out projects with Eylean Board.

Eylean is a versatile software and there are a few ways all of the things can be done. The backlog is no exception with a variation of backlogs through the different teams and projects. So just to get you on track, we will discuss the three most common ways the backlogs can be arranged – as a column, as a row and as a separate board.

Managing your backlog as a column is probably the most traditional way. In this case, you choose a section of columns, usually the one on the left side of the board and dedicate it to the backlog items. In this way, you will have a separate backlog for each row of the board and you will be able to see immediately how many tasks are waiting to be completed. While this is very convenient in seeing the progress of the project and the task load, it can get very busy and clustered when dealing with large projects. Therefore this way of backlog management is recommended for projects with fewer tasks.


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Planning on demand

Planning on demand is a method suited for fast paced production planning which has a dynamic, always changing environment. It is based on Scrumban methodology, which combines the flexibility of Kanban and the basic features of Scrum. The key principles of planning on demand are that you don’t plan too much, you control what is being done, your team is always occupied and a team is always aware of the situation.

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Scrum vs. Kanban vs. Scrumban: Boards, Rules, and Who Should Use It

In the previous blog posts we discussed the team members, roles, work routines, planning, estimation, scope, and other aspects of Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban.

There are a few other differences between the methodologies, which do not necessarily fall into one of the categories above. In this blog post we review the boards used in each case, prioritization, rules – and, most importantly – who should use which methodology.


The Scrum task board is defined and reset each sprint. As the backlog items move from backlog to completion during a sprint, and are planned separately for each sprint, the board is reset after the sprint is over.

Kanban and Scrumban boards remain persistent and are not reset, as there are no pre-set periods for backlog item completion.


Prioritization in Scrum is done through backlog. Therefore, the Scrum backlog is ordered and the most important items therefore end up being done first.

In Kanban, prioritization is optional. In Scrumban, prioritization is recommended during each planning.


Scrum is generally a constrained process, where the tasks are assigned to team members and bounded by deadlines. Therefore, Scrum is the most restrictive process of the three.

Kanban, on the other hand, has only a few constraints is a fairly flexible process.

Scrumban has a slightly constrained process and falls in between the two.

Who should use it?

While all three methodologies can be used in a variety of settings, there are a few aspects to take into account when considering whether to adopt different methodologies.

Scrum works well for large projects, and especially for projects with long-term maturity of more than a year. Therefore, Scrum is often chosen by enterprise teams seeking to make their process more effective.

Kanban has the unique ability to handle constant flow of incoming tasks, therefore it is often chosen by support and maintenance teams, or continuous product manufacturing – among other applications.

Finally, Scrumban is often used by fast-paced projects, as it combines the flexibility of Kanban with the basic features of Scrum. Therefore, it is often used in startups or, similarly to Kanban, where continuous product manufacturing is required.

It is however important to choose the process that works for you and customize it to fit your own requirements. Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban are just tools to make you and your team more productive – and therefore use them the way it works for you and your team, not necessarily following every rule to the T. Good luck!


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