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Vulcanizing Kanban

Volcano2Finding out about and covering various Kanban approaches is always very interesting – we want to stay on top of innovation that you are creating in the market. So when a creator of the Arrow Kanban board, Tomas Rybing, reached out to us with his new invention, we were both eager and excited to check it out. This time, he presented the Volcano – another interesting take on the traditional Kanban board.

According to Tomas, the Volcano was born out of the bugging need to combine multiple teams and multiple projects into one space. Unfortunately, the traditional Kanban board layout was not ideal for such a situation as everything ended up being mixed up and hard to separate. To achieve a clearer and more comfortable Kanban setting, he decided to separate the board into specific sections – one dedicated for the multiple product backlog and one section for each team involved in the project. This separation allowed to plan and prioritize the work globally, while at the same keeping the process of each team away from each other.

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Top 5 Most Innovative Kanban Boards

A few weeks ago we gathered up the top 5 most interesting scrum boards, unveiling the creativity and innovation in scrum. This time we decided to take another popular agile method – Kanban and see how the teams behind this approach have modified and improved their boards to make them more productive or even more fun.

The Space Saver

The issue of available space in the office is well known for most agile teams. While some dedicate their whole office or utilize the office halls, Olivier Lafontan offers a much simpler solution – turning the board into a square. Instead of moving tasks the traditional way from the left to the right column, he suggests moving them clockwise. A simply rearranged Kanban board is much more compact and will save a lot of headaches when starting to use the method.

Source: Olivier Lafontan

Source: Olivier Lafontan

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The Arrow that will change Kanban

We all know about the basic kanban board, the three columns and the WIPs, however, when you have been using kanban for a while, this is usually not enough anymore. At this point most of the teams chose to innovate themselves or start looking for the innovation elsewhere. However, with such little information available, they are truly grabbing on straws. That is why, we were extremely interested in and are excited to introduce to you the arrow approach for the kanban board by Tomas Rybing.

The arrow approach is aimed at transforming one of the key elements of the practice – the kanban board. It strives to optimize and improve the board, by introducing new elements and expanding its capacities. The main differences here are the priority pyramid and limits for the number of rows as well as stories per row. Even though it may sound complicated at first, it is actually quite straightforward and not only innovates the board, but brings it a whole new shape of an arrow as seen in the picture below.



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Moving your Kanban projects into Eylean

This week, we continue with the Eylean how-to series by taking a closer look into how your Kanban projects should be created or moved into Eylean. Starting with a new software or a new way of managing your daily tasks can be overwhelming sometimes, therefore we will give you some pointers to make the transition as smooth as possible. However as we always point out, these are only guidelines for when you first start and you should feel encouraged to experiment and to use Eylean in a way that best suits your process and your needs.

First up, you will need to create your board. We in Eylean like to give you choices therefore you are able to copy your existing Kanban board or to use a prepared template to start anew. If you want to have a replica of your existing board, simply enter all the specifics in the settings tab – you will create an exact match. However, if you are new to Kanban or wish to start fresh, you can use the provided template Kanban board that has the basic columns all set. One important thing to remember is that you can adjust and modify your boards at any time, especially if you feel that they do not fit your requirements anymore.


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Scrum vs. Kanban vs. Scrumban: Boards, Rules, and Who Should Use It

In the previous blog posts we discussed the team members, roles, work routines, planning, estimation, scope, and other aspects of Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban.

There are a few other differences between the methodologies, which do not necessarily fall into one of the categories above. In this blog post we review the boards used in each case, prioritization, rules – and, most importantly – who should use which methodology.


The Scrum task board is defined and reset each sprint. As the backlog items move from backlog to completion during a sprint, and are planned separately for each sprint, the board is reset after the sprint is over.

Kanban and Scrumban boards remain persistent and are not reset, as there are no pre-set periods for backlog item completion.


Prioritization in Scrum is done through backlog. Therefore, the Scrum backlog is ordered and the most important items therefore end up being done first.

In Kanban, prioritization is optional. In Scrumban, prioritization is recommended during each planning.


Scrum is generally a constrained process, where the tasks are assigned to team members and bounded by deadlines. Therefore, Scrum is the most restrictive process of the three.

Kanban, on the other hand, has only a few constraints is a fairly flexible process.

Scrumban has a slightly constrained process and falls in between the two.

Who should use it?

While all three methodologies can be used in a variety of settings, there are a few aspects to take into account when considering whether to adopt different methodologies.

Scrum works well for large projects, and especially for projects with long-term maturity of more than a year. Therefore, Scrum is often chosen by enterprise teams seeking to make their process more effective.

Kanban has the unique ability to handle constant flow of incoming tasks, therefore it is often chosen by support and maintenance teams, or continuous product manufacturing – among other applications.

Finally, Scrumban is often used by fast-paced projects, as it combines the flexibility of Kanban with the basic features of Scrum. Therefore, it is often used in startups or, similarly to Kanban, where continuous product manufacturing is required.

It is however important to choose the process that works for you and customize it to fit your own requirements. Scrum, Kanban, and Scrumban are just tools to make you and your team more productive – and therefore use them the way it works for you and your team, not necessarily following every rule to the T. Good luck!


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